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  • Vineyard Area: 18 ha
  • Soil Type: Sand, loam and gravel on a clay subsoil
  • Varieties Cultivated: Sauvignon Blanc
  • Country: France
  • Winemaker: Philippe Portier

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Before starting his eponymous winery in 1991, this modest third-generation farmer spent years crafting the local goat cheese and growing 200 hectares of grains—a true, old- school polyculturist with a strong understanding of the local terroir that provided extra insight when he turned to viticulture. Philippe quickly became a leading force in the appellation, farming vineyards composed of sand, loam and gravel on a clay subsoil from the Portlandian era that impart a penetrating minerality and a full texture.
 
One of the most well-respected vignerons of Quincy. Before starting his eponymous winery in 1991, this modest, third-generation farmer from the Berry spent years crafting the local goat cheese, as well as growing 200 hectares of grains—a true, old school polyculturist with a strong understanding of regional terroir. This is particularly significant in Quincy, where the sandy loam soils are optimal for many different plants, including vines, which were first studied by 14th century Cistercian monks.
 
THE MOST WELL-RESPECTED VIGNERON OF QUINCY
 
Quincy has long been appreciated for producing elegant wines, although the area was all but decimated when oïdium and phylloxera hit in the 19th century. As the plantings have increased over the last few decades, Philippe has become a leading force in the appellation, farming 18 out of its total 270 hectares around the village of Brinay on the banks of the Cher River. In addition to bottling his own wines, Philippe created the Cave Romane de Brinay in 1993, a local cooperative that helps promote the wines of his peers.
 
Quincy is a haven for Sauvignon Blanc, offering a unique expression of the grape considering its proximity to the Kimmeridgian limestone chain. Philippe’s soils are composed of sand, loam and gravel on a clay subsoil from the Portlandian era that impart the wines with a penetrating minerality and a fuller texture than that of Quincy’s neighbors, Reuilly and Sancerre. The optimal sun exposure of the vines insures perfect maturation and Philippe pulls leaves to fend off rot. Philippe works hard to keep yields low, which he accomplishes with a winter pruning followed by a green harvest in July. Weather vanes are placed throughout the vineyards to always keep track of which way the wind is blowing.
 
Following the harvest, the grapes are separated by individual parcels and cold macerated, partially on their skins at 17 to 18°C—a practice ahead of its time in Quincy that enhances the aromatics and texture in the final wines. The grapes are pressed gently and then racked into temperature-controlled, stainless steel tanks where they undergo fermentation. The wines are stirred on their lees and bottled in March, following the harvest. The finished wine is both stony and creamy, effusive with notes of dried garden herbs and tropical fruits.
 

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